11

For me, being no native speaker, the sentence was difficult to understand before the edit. Allowing users to fix grammar mistakes is a win, in my opinion.


10

Meh. The blame here is primarily on the reviewers, and I don't see a compelling reason for Stack Exchange employees to be privileged if Stack Exchange doesn't see fit to give them a diamond. What if I copy edited a post in preparation for sharing it in my company newsletter? Suggested edits are not too minor if they improve the post. An edit is too minor ...


9

I must admit I did the same when I was a new user, until Mark pinged me in chat and explained that I wasn't really helping, and I intend to do the same with Soner Gönül. That said, I think the main problem here is the approvers, relating to my own experience, I had no idea I was doing it wrong, as my suggestions kept getting approved. In any case, keep ...


7

Good to be noticed! Indeed, I make these minor (occasionally significant) edits once a week in preparation for the week's Ask Stack column at Ars Technica. As you know, it's easy to get hung up on a minor speling or, punctuation error. And it's important to me that the awesome questions and answers here aren't overshadowed by a trivial slip of the keyboard....


6

Generally speaking and with no offense to Sam... my initial reaction is that no, we shouldn't do anything special here. Most employees don't require special privileges across the network. Heck, many of us aren't really using the sites and/or aren't always in tune with how individual communities work. Those of us who do have network-wide diamonds take great ...


6

You were unlucky, the author of the answer was editing the post at the same time, and your edits conflicted. When that happens, the suggested edit "loses" and appears as rejected by Community ♦. That said, your edit, albeit helpful, was a bit minor. Suggested edits are generally expected to substantially improve a post, and adding the image inline wasn't ...


5

The close reason of unclear isn't really accurate. This question is primarily opinion based, since it's a name this thing question. The edit does not resolve the reasons for closing the question and make it into a question that would be reopened, so rejecting the edits is appropriate to prevent the question from being bumped back to the homepage.


4

Go to the suggestions tab on your profile page. This lists all the suggested edits you've made. If you click on the suggested edit link you'll see your edit and how it was resolved. In this case the reason was: This edit is too minor; suggested edits should be substantive improvements addressing multiple issues in the post. Basically you only added one ...


4

Under your Programmer's profile, click activity in the middle of the page, click suggestions and click on any of the suggested edit links to determine the information about the accepted or rejected status:


3

Yes. Manual edits should never remove the auto inserted duplicate text. The only mitigating factor might be that he started his edit before the question was closed as a duplicate. The edit time and close time are approximately the same so that's entirely possible. The only ramifications for the user would be if he had multiple consecutive edits rejected. ...


3

Your edit was rejected by DXM, the original author of the answer, that's why your edit is no longer visible in the answer. He left you a comment there explaining the rejection: The OP is asking about programming languages. These are APIs to other technologies, so I don't feel they are exactly relevant to my answer. To see the history of your suggested ...


3

There's not a lot we (as moderators) can do other than reject the edits as they appear. Suspending the user would be overkill for one bad edit, however if the behaviour persisted then it might be in order. A history of bad suggested edits will also result in a ban from suggesting edits so rejection is exactly the right thing to do in these circumstances.


2

I am in favour of edits that remove irrelevant phrases. Any such edit is an improvement to the overall quality of the site. However, merely removing “Hope this helps.” is a very minor edit, especially compared with the length of that specific answer. When you edit a post, try to improve it as much as possible. Do not focus on only a single problem with a ...


2

The too minor reason exists because all edits by low rep users have to be reviewed by another user, therefore we try to maximize the benefit of their effort by encouraging only substantial edits. In this case your edit made the question grammatically correct, but the meaning was still clear in the incorrect version, so little was gained. Somewhat more ...


2

If this is a serial problem, then I think there's also another reason: the community hasn't done a very good job of filling in the tag wikis on large numbers of tags. Then someone new to the site, without a solid knowledge of plagiarism rules notices the deficit, and attempts to correct it. A more permanent solution might be to organize an effort on the ...


2

They are valid edits in the sense that they are making the post better, but are they making the post better enough? If there are spelling mistakes or typos or a missing tag then there's probably something else wrong with the post as well. You have to ask why weren't these other areas addressed at the same time. However, this isn't always the case - an ...


1

Well, if there is a trend, it might be my fault! Insofar I've rejected only two edits: One that only removed the automated duplicate notification, A weird one that revised only two words, that where referenced in a comment to the question Those where too minor, but obviously also otherwise problematic. But I can't really say I happened upon really minor ...


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