19

There are two answers to your question: how the site theoretically works, and how it actually works in practice. In theory, the border is that questions should have answers that are supportable by objective statements, and aren't purely a matter of taste. In practice, the border is much more strict than that. The first reason is that voters are often not ...


13

This is difficult. I see a few bounds on when a question is acceptable: A question should seek for solutions, not opinions. For example, consider a hypothetical question I am considering solution A or solution B. Context is this and that. Which solution is better? Answer: Obviously the one with fluffy kittens. The question could be made more concrete ...


10

Just for the record, of the two questions you linked to, one was closed by 5 community members and the second was closed by a moderator in response to a user's flag on the post. Both were closed for the reason of "not constructive", which is defined not only in the FAQ's first three questions, but also two blog posts on the Stack Exchange blog - Good ...


9

When every answer to a question is potentially equally correct - and there could conceivably be quite a few answers, there's a pretty good chance that you've started a discussion instead of asking a question (or a question that kicks off a discussion or debate). That's not always true, but it's a good way to tell when you're venturing into the land of off-...


8

In the case where you are lacking the knowledge needed to fully understand the subject matter, do nothing. It could be clear, it could not be. There's no need to reduce the reputation of a user or kick something to a queue if you can't be sure. If you understand the subject matter, I wouldn't vote to close or downvote immediately. I'd recommend asking ...


7

The question looks right. Still, I have absolutely no idea what the person is talking about. I would say do nothing. If you have no knowledge of the questions subject matter, but it looks clear, useful and you think they've done their research then don't vote and move onto the next question. You don't have to vote on every single question on the site.


6

Yeah, ok, done. Editorial note (May 26, 2015): It's instructive to look back now on the direction the Programmers community took after the enforcement of these standards began... Today it remains an excellent venue for conceptual questions on programming and software development, but has little patience for the sorts of overtly-subjective discussions (some ...


4

The new product that the creators of Stackoverflow and the StackExchange network is Discourse. This new discourse platform might be useful for such discussions.


4

With regards to the question How important is it to have a consistent technological stack?, that question can be paraphrased as I currently have a technology stack with technology A for the front-end and technology B for the backend. Recent developments in the technologies have made it possible to use either for both the front-end and the backend. ...


4

Having cast the first close vote on the question used as example, and having reverted my vote now, here is my reasoning why I believed the question to be primarily opinion based. Originally, I thought the question was asking for opinions on the pattern that a caught exception gets passed to a secondary function for handling (and the exception would be ...


3

You can ask questions that lend themselves to answers based on subjective experiences: subjectivity does not necessarily mean opinion-based or discussion-based. Most types of questions on Programmers may not have an objectively correct answer that works for all situations, but they are still okay here because: Some answers are better than others, and that ...


3

This has been discussed before on Meta Stack Overflow. I can't find the specific question, but a search for "hide reputation" gives 24 results. These three questions: Should there be anonymous answers (and questions)? Should reputation be hidden until an answer is accepted? Hide the rep and badge count on a user's info box on answers Are closest to ...


3

Sure! Suppose there are actual differences between Way #1 and Way #2. These would be good answers: "Way #1 exposes you to a race condition where...but the X in Way #2 avoids this problem." "Way #1 has better worst-case performance, even though Way #2 is, on average, faster" Alternately, if there's no difference: "No. Way #1 actually just calls something ...


2

I acknowledge this is an old discussion and things might've changed, but this is a rampant issue especially on SO. Allow them, because they are vital, but I think the borderline is decided by the asker's willingness to add details to their question. Some of these questions are gold-mines waiting to happen. I'm one of the people who used to ask these "stupid"...


1

As written, the question doesn't seem relevant to the site. A better wording might be, "Do studies show that programmers program better when it is quiet than when it is not? Have managements acted accordingly?" Now, you are putting "quiet" in the category of "best practices," an objective goal, as opposed to a subjective "need" by programmers. And by ...


1

You could have asked, "How do you determine the optimum work environment for programmers?" When there is contradictory or limited research, professional opinions are the next best thing and I don't consider that as purely subjective. Having research is great, but will those finding generalize to other programmers, but more importantly, how does it help me/my ...


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