46

I'm not a particularly high-ranked user (Programmers: 4892, SO: 16,584), but I don't ask many questions. That doesn't mean I don't have questions about the software I build. I have questions every single day. It just means my questions don't work well on StackExchange. My questions: Require too much context - It isn't feasible to share all of the business ...


35

Speaking personally I'm at the stage in my career/life where I don't have many questions left to ask. What I do have is many years of experience in encountering the problems that other people ask about so I can offer my solutions, knowledge and experience to hopefully help them.


17

Most people who get a high rank in this fashion do so partially because they understand how to work with SE sites in general to get information, and in their understanding is one little key factoid: Before asking on SE, you should do some of your own leg work to show you've tried to solve it yourself, as questions that show no effort on the part of the ...


7

I think that one topic is missing here: Many experienced users are searching for answers before asking one. I, for myself, have found useful answers on the different stack exchange sites. So before I only think about asking a question I try to find an answer and have not to ask my question because my question was already asked by other people so I can use ...


7

I'm sure there's always going to be overlap - look at the issues around certain Programmers questions that could be on The Workplace. The answer is not to infer that, because some questions are in the grey area between sites, that then all questions must be in the same grey area, and merging sites is required. I do think the "branding" between the sites ...


6

I think one of the reasons is that people who answer questions a lot are willing to put much more effort into it. If you look at me, I read blogs, I read books, I watch presentations of conferences. If a question is interesting, I am willing to search through the documentation to find a type or method that fits or to look at the source code of the library ...


5

I see very little wrong with this behavior. I only see two questionable statements - the one calling the question "silly" and the one indicating that "you're not listening at all". Those statements seem unnecessary. When you post a question, people can engage with it in multiple ways. Leaving comments is one such way. You can choose to ignore the comments ...


4

I think it has to do with the nature of http://programmers.stackexchange.com. The questions on this particular site tend to be more conceptual by nature. Programming concepts are something you tend to learn earlier on in your career. That's not to say that you don't learn more concepts as your career goes on, but you generally have a good foundation and can ...


3

There's some argument for shipping those questions over here, and not just centered around the file things neatly because everything has its place manner of thinking. Stack Overflow, today, doesn't really like those kinds of questions1 and many would be happy to ship the impetus for folks to ask them over here. But that's just it, Stack Overflow loses ...


3

I don't know, not having access to the source code, but I suspect that changes within the 5 minute window during which votes can be changed wouldn't be recorded. So in your case the up-vote followed immediately by the removal of that vote are effectively not recorded. If the vote had "hardened" and then you edited the post which would allow the vote to be ...


2

click on the "Users" link on the Menu Bar of every page https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/users


2

In a perfect world, a high score here correlates with expertise/experience. I think that correlation is confirmed with your observation (not proven just strengthened). I've asked one question here and it was closed because I was explicitly asking for opinions.


2

I know a few high-ranked users who have asked little to no questions. I think there is a certain element of confidence and bravado whereby they don't feel that they have many questions left or much to ask. This may be true. My experience over 30 years tells me that is unlikely to be true. That's why I feel it's important to keep finding and asking ...


2

Just saying, but I'm sure a lot of people have multiple accounts - one for asking questions and one for posting especially good answers. They can then use their 'answering' account on their resumé/CV, keeping any newbie questions they may have asked concealed. :)


2

Most people are just better at giving advice and solving other people's problems than being able to do any type of introspection to identify their own problems. Programmers with a high reputation may work at places with a lot of resources: training, mentors, larger teams etc. I work alone, so I have to rely on SO more now than I use to. For those who don't ...


1

I find this an odd question, rep is - or at least was - accumulated substantially by providing answers that are deemed by the assembled participants to have merit. I don't quite see how my asking questions provides an insight into the quality of answers based on knowledge accumulated over decades - I came here substantially in an attempt to give back by ...


1

Short answer: Low-ranked users ask, and high-ranked users answer. High ranked users, almost by definition, are people who are knowledgeable about the topic. As such, they have many answers and few questions. Most (not all) of the questioners have limited knowledge of the topic, and have low ranks because of this. They ask questions to fill gaps in their ...


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