12

There exists a grace period for 5 minutes after the first submit that rolls all edits in that time into the original post so they don't count so you can make those quick minor edits. Otherwise start taking advantage of the instant preview it works great and it seems pretty crazy that you prefer more clicks to format your answer. Also please note that posting ...


11

This might be a good example of an unfair CW, every edit added something valuable to the answer and there doesn't seem to be a series of minor edits that would point to rep whoring. Furthermore all edits are by the answer's author, I don't see any reason to encourage collaboration, which is what CW is supposed to be about. Also, it's worth pointing out that ...


11

The answer is exceptional and all edits added information to it. Even if the author intended to bump the answer, he did so with significant improvements and I think in this particular instance CW feels more like a penalty than an incentive for other users to continue evolving the answer. So, I've removed the CW status from the answer. I don't think there is ...


9

I must admit I did the same when I was a new user, until Mark pinged me in chat and explained that I wasn't really helping, and I intend to do the same with Soner Gönül. That said, I think the main problem here is the approvers, relating to my own experience, I had no idea I was doing it wrong, as my suggestions kept getting approved. In any case, keep ...


8

The Scala tag wiki on Stack Overflow is rather, well, interesting in this regard - have a look at it. Someone actually wove together almost an entire language tutorial from one question successively to another, then another. That's great for a whole language tag, but it doesn't really allow for the smaller segments of 'chains' that you're talking about. I'...


5

This is by design: How does a post become a Community Wiki post? There are several ways a question or answer can enter community wiki mode, and most of >these ways will occur automatically based on the rules of the system. Posts enter community wiki mode when one of the following happens: The body of the post has been edited† by ...


4

First and foremost, Stack Exchange is not a forum. There's a really good blog post on this that I can't find right now. The tl;dr version is that forums have a terrible signal to noise ratio. Stack Exchange exists to build a library of high-quality questions and answers. Oddly enough, solving any one user's problem isn't as high a priority as one might ...


4

Yes, it is possible to remove the community wiki status of a question. However, it is a very rare thing to do. I've done it in the past when someone has made too many edits to their own question or they've been the "victim" of several other users making essentially duplicate edits in a short period of time. As for your question: With more than 15 answers (...


4

The person who asked the question (and also provided both answers so far) individually made their answers into community wiki. It wasn't an automatic conversion - the question is not CW and any new answers won't be CW either.


3

I agree that Ian's answer is excellent, continues to get better, and deserves as much rep as it can gather. However, I would warn that picking winners for which the rules don't apply is probably dangerous. There are many Programmers users trying to improve the overall signal-to-noise ratio by arguing that the site's rules are well-defined and regular. When ...


2

I've updated the following tag pages to include links to the Amazon pages for the books mentioned in the question: https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/tags/agile/info https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/tags/scrum/info https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/tags/extreme-programming/info https://softwareengineering.stackexchange....


2

The original poster has the same standing to edit as everyone else having sufficient rep to edit. In fact, suggested edits have pretty much invalidated the notion of community-owned posts (since anyone can suggest an edit).


2

If this is a serial problem, then I think there's also another reason: the community hasn't done a very good job of filling in the tag wikis on large numbers of tags. Then someone new to the site, without a solid knowledge of plagiarism rules notices the deficit, and attempts to correct it. A more permanent solution might be to organize an effort on the ...


1

StackExchange uses voting system to make good answers go all way up and bad ones all way down, not to give rewards and reputations to people. (And a reputation system is perhaps a way to rate users as well as give them permissions based on their reps) Upvoting/Downvoting means this vote is useful/not useful


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible