4

I just failed on a review audit honeypot.

Can someone tell me why this isn't a resource request and why it shouldn't be closed (until it's revised)?

What is an example of a continuation not implemented as a procedure?

1

The title is what saves the question, IMO.

What is an example of a continuation not implemented as a procedure?

The title steers the question towards "hey, I don't get this thing. Can someone explain it better?"

But I see and agree with your confusion. This is the current last paragraph:

Are there any examples of languages where a continuation is expressed in a more abstract way than a function? I know Scheme allows you to grab the current continuation in a first-class manner (call/cc), but even so, it seems that the one argument procedure passed to call/cc is simply given the current continuation in the form of another one argument procedure to which the call/cc'd function can apply its result.

The first sentence there is a polling based question, which would be grounds for closing the question.

So I changed it to this:

To help my understanding, can an example be provided in a functional language where the continuation is expressed in a more abstract way than a function?

This avoids the poll, but still maintains the OPs request for a "real" example to explain the question.

  • Thanks. I appreciate the effort. Although I don't want to be confused with a bot. I wish someone could reverse my failed audit. – Jim G. Sep 30 '13 at 23:59
  • 4
    That's only possible for people with direct access to the database @JimG. If you really want the audit to be cleared from your reviewing history, your only option is to contact SE directly. That said, in the extremely unlikely chance you find yourself edit-banned (which would be partially because of this failed audit), feel free to ping me in chat to clear the ban (that, I can do). – yannis Oct 1 '13 at 0:13
  • 2
    @JimG. I have failed a few audits, and there are several of those that I have gone back into the question and kicked it into the close review queue. The review bans are flexible enough to allow for some mistakes without any / many issues for the occasional miss. Worst case means that you'll see audit questions pop up more frequently. – GlenH7 Oct 1 '13 at 0:30
  • @YannisRizos: Many thanks. – Jim G. Oct 1 '13 at 0:48

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .