3

https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/184912/is-node-js-a-suitable-server-platform-for-financial-applications

Please tell me why this isn't a good question for the site? As it turns out there are some serious issues with node/JS and floating point calculations, making it totally unfit for monetary transactions, according to the maintainers. Hopefully anyone else who wants to know the answer finds where to get help, since we've decided not to.

UPDATE:

One of the mods actually suggested that I make it more specific, and so I have, and I'm also going to post an answer in a moment that I got from a node maintainer.

  • 1
    As it turns out there are some serious issues with node/JS and floating point calculations, making it totally unfit for monetary transactions, according to the maintainers. - You're proving a negative. What if NodeJs supported floating point numbers? How could someone reasonably convince you that it was "fit" for financial platforms? – Jim G. Jan 27 '13 at 20:24
  • @JimG. I've already been convinced of it. – Nathan C. Tresch Jan 28 '13 at 1:33
  • @JimG. After researching and asking more questions I've been convinced that as long as I use a well maintained decimal package Node isn't going to screw me over, and ultimately that's what I was looking for, is 1) any problems and 2) how to mitigate them. I WANT to use node, I wasn't looking for a reason not to use it, just being cautious. Question: For clarity and help to others should I put this information in an answer to the original question? – Nathan C. Tresch Jan 28 '13 at 1:47
4

People do get close votes wrong. Closing is not the end of a question. If there are deficiencies or ambiguities in the question they can be addressed and the question reopened if warranted.

You have done the right thing by bringing this up in Meta.

You can also bring it up in chat.

In this case I have reopened the question.

  • 1
    I wouldn't say the close votes were wrong, the original version of the question could go either way. The updated version is certainly a far better question, I think this is a great example of how the close - edit - re-open cycle should work. – yannis Jan 28 '13 at 2:56
2

I think sometimes when you post something that potentially points out a real factual flaw in a popular language or framework then some get a bit worried about it all devolving into a flame war and then it becomes a NC mess.

It is a fair question and a good one at that. In these cases it is best to improve the question and moderate the answers and comments to make sure that people are actually trying to answer the question without merely attacking the argument.

  • 3
    Check the revision history, the real factual flaw was pointed out after the question was closed. I happened to be in chat when the question was closed and asked Nathan to make it a bit more specific, he did, and we now have a great question and answer for the site. Nathan's constructive approach to the initial closure is a great example of how to get your question re-opened with minimal fuss. – yannis Jan 28 '13 at 3:00

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .