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This question was closed as non constructive with no comments or feedback of why it is considered of low quality.
IMHO, I believe the question is reasonable and answerable from anyone with good experience.

Similar question were posted on some time ago, but specific to certain languages:
How can I test PHP skills in a interview? with a great answer provided by Yannis Rizos one of the moderators.
.net Interviews a question about interviewing a senior .Net developer.
How you prepared for your .NET interview?
What are some tasks you might ask a potential ruby developer hire to complete?

So why a question about a non-language specific interview was closed?

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    It's asking for a list. SE doesn't work that way. One question, one correct answer; not one question, multiple correct answers. As you pointed out, the other question was "specific to certain languages," which is probably why it got a pass. SE is not a list collection mechanism. – Robert Harvey Aug 29 '12 at 15:27
  • Programmers.SE has gone through a long, painful, protracted period of refining its scope. The first link, with Yannos' answer, is almost a year old. – Robert Harvey Aug 29 '12 at 15:30
  • @RobertHarvey I see your point, but nobody provided a way or pointed out how to improve this question. – Songo Aug 29 '12 at 15:30
  • Hey, don't blame me, I was a regular user when I wrote that answer ;) – yannis Aug 29 '12 at 16:52
  • @YannisRizos hehe Thanks for the support :P and although a little late: "Congratulations on your promotion to a moderator" :))) – Songo Aug 30 '12 at 0:07
  • @Songo Well, for that particular question it would be better to point to StasM's answer than mine, he's a PHP core contributor. – yannis Aug 30 '12 at 0:26
  • @YannisRizos Ok, Can I ask why is this question here on meta is getting downvoted severely? The question is clear enough, I did research for similar posts, I provided 4 examples to similar questions that were all open when I posted them. Why are people downvoting this when I clearly posted a good inquiry? – Songo Aug 30 '12 at 8:22
  • Traditionally on Meta we vote to show agreement/disagreement with the question's premise and not so much to comment on the question's quality. Check out the Meta FAQ. – yannis Aug 30 '12 at 8:28
  • @YannisRizos aah I see. Thanks for the clarification :) – Songo Aug 30 '12 at 8:48
  • @Sonjo You have to realise that there is no point to the programmers stack exchange. If you have a specific programming based question (a detailed "how" question) you can ask it on Stack Overflow, or a specific coding problem on Code Review. Looking for detailed answers that are not themselves definitive was only allowed in older questions. – Stumbler Apr 9 '15 at 9:51
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I closed it following a flag because it can be interpreted in one of two ways, both of which make it not a good question. It can either be viewed as asking for a list, which isn't a good fit on any Stack Exchange site since there's no singular right answer. It can also be viewed as a resource request question (asking for someone to provide you with an existing list), which is best accomplished using a search engine, since Stack Exchange sites are designed to support answers that rely on experiences and knowledge rather than links to outside resources.

The other questions weren't closed because the community never voted on them nor were they flagged. However, I just read all of them (treating this post as a flag on all of them) and closed them as not constructive for the exact same reason that I closed yours for.

I didn't feel there was a need to explicitly leave a comment on your post explaining the problem, since the close message clearly indicates the reason and the FAQ provides guidance as to what to do.

  • so I was just unlucky?! :) but still nobody gave any hint about how to improve the question. Really disappointing coz I was looking for some great answers since I did Google for a similar question, but most results were centered about one language. – Songo Aug 29 '12 at 15:34
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    @Songo All the hints you need are in the FAQ. The FAQ is linked to in the close message. I'm not sure exactly what else you're looking for... – Thomas Owens Aug 29 '12 at 15:36
  • well since you closed all the links I provided in my post I think mine would have been inevitable :D Thanks anyway – Songo Aug 29 '12 at 15:45
  • Ironic use of the word "constructive" is ironic. – Stumbler Apr 9 '15 at 9:54
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The way you get these kinds of questions to work is to ask how, not what.

Instead of asking:

Q: What’s the best low light point-and-shoot camera?

A: Canon S90 and Lumix LX3.

Ask this:

Q: How do I tell which point-and-shoot cameras take good low light photos?

A: I strongly recommend looking for something with

    a fast lens (2.0 at least)
    reasonable ISO handling (at least 400, but preferably 800)
    the biggest sensor available

The sum of these factors are really critical for low light situations.

Ref: http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2010/11/qa-is-hard-lets-go-shopping/

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    Even "how" questions might not be good enough if there's a large number of equally good ways to do something. The question needs to be specific and detailed enough to have a limited number of appropriate and good "how"s, but at the same time be general enough to be useful to the wider population. – Thomas Owens Aug 29 '12 at 15:35
  • Then if I rewrote the question as "How to test a senior web developer skills without a specific language?" it would be a better question? – Songo Aug 29 '12 at 15:36
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    Eh, that sounds really vague. What specific problem are you trying to solve? The question should be answerable without having to write an essay. BTW everyone knows pseudocode, or some bastardized version of C. They'd better have some kind of coding skill in your target language, if they expect to be one of your senior developers. – Robert Harvey Aug 29 '12 at 15:37
  • @ThomasOwens this answer is the kind of hint that I was looking for to improve the question :) however it seems my question can't be salvaged T_T – Songo Aug 29 '12 at 15:40
  • @RobertHarvey Then the question can't be saved?! :( – Songo Aug 29 '12 at 15:42
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    I don't think it can. It's based on a false premise; that you can somehow hire a senior developer without knowing anything about their coding ability in the target language. If you're applying for such a job, the only thing you can do is brush up on your Computer Science skills; data structures, theory, that sort of thing. – Robert Harvey Aug 29 '12 at 15:45

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