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Why are you closing so many questions? Clearly they're drawn to questions FOR or ABOUT programmers, and are general enough to be related to 'programmers'. Why is time management not allowed to be posted, for example? There's tag for "time-management", clearly, this is within scope.

My question had +2 and been fav'd. Clearly people want to know best time manager for programmers in OSX.

You're operating outside of the FAQ. Mark Trapp, and other mods, chill out.

migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jul 4 '11 at 21:43

This question came from our site for professionals, academics, and students working within the systems development life cycle.

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    Posting a link (or more information about, if it was deleted) to your question asking the reasons of why it was closed is more useful than just ranting about it. Maybe it has good reasons to be closed. Or maybe it was really unfair and it should be reopened. But talk about this and not just rant against Mark Trapp or the other mods. – Vitor Py Jul 4 '11 at 21:49
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    This is the question - programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/89585/… - and was closed as a duplicate – ChrisF Jul 4 '11 at 21:52
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    Pro tip: Acting like a child and calling mods "batshit crazy" isn't helping your cause. You come off like an angry adolescent. – Ed S. Jul 4 '11 at 21:56
  • It was first closed as off-topic. Then changed to duplicate. On top of that, the "duplicate" question was closed as off-topic, as mine was originally. – David Jul 4 '11 at 21:57
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    I DO think it's really funny that so many questions are closed. Mostly with good reason (thank you mods). But it's a bit embarrassing that there are so many closed. Can we be a bit more lenient on duplicate questions that might spark good discussion on topics that people who have recently joined might be interested in? I mean, I think there's value to more people being "engaged" in the site. – Trevor Jul 4 '11 at 21:57
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    @Ed, duly noted - I was frustrated. @Trevor, You've asked 0 questions. Try asking something you believe is programmer-related, and you'll see how frustrating it is. – David Jul 4 '11 at 22:00
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    Related: Frequently closing popular questions – user8 Jul 4 '11 at 22:02
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    @Trevor: There is no reason to leave a duplicate topic open. If you want to add to the discussion then do so in the original topic. – Ed S. Jul 4 '11 at 22:03
  • How about if there's some kind of check-balance system. If a question has enough upvotes / favs, then mods can't just close it at will. Even with the upvotes and being favd, it was immediately closed as off-topic (and then changed to dupe). Keep in mind, dupes don't apply when time has passed and previous suggestions might now be obsolete. So maybe only being able to mark as dupe for time difference of 6 months (stacked). Meaning, can't dupe something that wasn't asked in last 6 months, unless there's a connecting duplicate. – David Jul 4 '11 at 22:05
  • @Ed - There is a very valid reason. Topics get stale and old answers don't apply. For example, I discovered TaskPaper, that was not available when the "original" dupe was first asked. Under your strict-no-dupes philosophy, the only answer will be "notepad", or pen and paper, since it doesn't allow for progress. To answer your question, original topic was closed as being "off topic", which is why this post was made in the first place. – David Jul 4 '11 at 22:07
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    @David precisely because lists of recommendations are so frequently out of date is why they're off-topic on Stack Exchange. Check out Q&A is Hard, Let's Go Shopping! for more detail about this issue. – user8 Jul 4 '11 at 22:27
  • It's highly ironic that this question was posted to the wrong place, and had to be migrated here. – Robert Harvey Sep 16 '11 at 21:11
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As ChrisF mentioned, questions need to invite some unique insight from programmers beyond just a simple "I'm asking programmers" clause. In terms of possible scope, we want to hit the blue area of this diagram:

Programmers.SE scope

Additionally, real questions invite answers, not ideas, opinions, or lists. From our FAQ:

You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Chatty, open-ended questions diminish the usefulness of our site and push other questions off the front page.

If your motivation for asking the question is “I would like to participate in a discussion about _____”, then you should not be asking here. (You are more than welcome to have such discussions in our real time web chat.) However, if your motivation is “I would like others to explain ______ to me”, then you are probably OK.

To prevent your question from being flagged and possibly removed, avoid asking subjective questions where …

  • every answer is equally valid: “What’s your favorite ______?”

I closed it as off-topic per these guidelines: Stack Exchange is not well suited for generating lists of recommendations.

However, after looking around, I found we had an earlier round that I thought might be helpful (even if it happened to have been closed), so I changed the close reason to exact duplicate to provide a link back to the earlier question.

As others have noted, it's probably a better fit for Productivity.SE or even Project Management.SE, but the guidelines about open-ended questions are a network-wide thing, and lists of recommendations are off-topic everywhere, not just on Programmers.SE.

Further reading:

Also check out Frequently closing popular questions, where the idea that the guidelines in place shouldn't apply to popular questions was discussed.

8

Just because there's a tag doesn't make the question on topic.

I could create the tag "caving" on Stack Overflow as I have more than 1,500 reputation on the site (source) and ask about caving and potholing. It doesn't make the question on topic.

I know it's an extreme example, but the applying the same logic if any user with more than 1,500 reputation asks a question that requires a new tag, any tag, does that make it on topic?

Also the tag could well date from the beta period when the reputation required to create tags was much less - 150 reputation in fact (source) and what we considered to be on and off topic different to what it is today.

To answer your specific issue with questions - these do not uniquely affect software developers. Anybody who works where they have multiple, equally important tasks to do requires good time management skills.

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    Except I'm asking on a programmers forum, which means I'm not looking to, for example, write an essay. Those two task management techniques are very different, obviously. I was looking to get the opinion of programmers, just as the other closed questions were seeking. It's not just programmers-related, but it's opinions of peers which makes it relevant. – David Jul 4 '11 at 21:54
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    @David - This site is not a forum. It's a question and answer site where we (like all site on the Stack Exchange network) have strict guidelines about what is and what isn't on topic to ensure that we get good quality questions and answers. – ChrisF Jul 4 '11 at 21:57
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    I think closing it was a bit harsh. Perhaps the question should have been migrated to productivity.stackexchange.com instead. – tehnyit Jul 4 '11 at 22:03
  • @tehnyit - possibly, however, I would suspect that it would be a duplicate were it to be migrated. – ChrisF Jul 4 '11 at 22:05
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    @tehyit - I've just checked on the productivity site and it appears that most questions of this type have been closed as "not constructive" so there may not be a home for it anywhere on the network at the moment. – ChrisF Jul 4 '11 at 22:14
  • @ChrisF: What's 'caving'? Is that popular in the UK? // Would you mind using an example that we can all relate to? Just an FYI, many people from the U.S. use this site. Thanks. – Jim G. Aug 14 '11 at 16:18
  • @Jim G. "caving" is meant to be a tag that has no meaning on Stack Overflow, relating as it does to pot-holing and crawling about in caves. – ChrisF Aug 14 '11 at 16:20
  • @ChrisF: OK. Thanks. – Jim G. Aug 14 '11 at 16:35
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This is the complete text of your question:

Best simplest project / todo manager for programmers in OSX

I'm trying to figure out the best project / todo manager.

I am a single programmer, working on a single project in spare time.

I've tried using TextEdit (notepad), I've tried big project managers, they're too cumbersome with due dates, start dates, etc. I spend more time organizing what's next and how it's linked with everything else than actually programming / testing.

I need some suggestions. Right now I'm using TaskPaper, which gets the job done very well, but am open for others' suggestions. It has to be for OSX.

This is explicitly covered in https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/faq#dontask

To prevent your question from being flagged and possibly removed, avoid asking subjective questions where …

  • every answer is equally valid: “What’s your favorite ______?”
  • your answer is provided along with the question, and you expect more answers: “I use ______ for ______, what do you use?”

Your question has the "every answer is equally valid" and the "What do you use? I'll go first" problems, which are listed above.

3

Typically its not just the moderator's input that goes into closing a post. Users have the ability to input on these kinds of issues. If I've understood correctly in the last several months that I've been on here, moderators go a lot based on the input of other users on matters of this nature. There are strict guidelines (though programmers.SE is much more lenient on the guidelines than other SE sites) for the purpose of keeping the site more useful in the long run than forum sites can be.

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How about if there's some kind of check-balance system. If a question has enough upvotes / favs, then mods can't just close it at will. Even with the upvotes and being favd, it was immediately closed as off-topic (and then changed to dupe). Keep in mind, dupes don't apply when time has passed and previous suggestions might now be obsolete. So maybe only being able to mark as dupe for time difference of 6 months (stacked). Meaning, can't dupe something that wasn't asked in last 6 months, unless there's a connecting duplicate.

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