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It is tempting for students to ask their homework questions here, and it is equally tempting for people that know the answer to chip in with their answers. What are the ethics of this practice? (I have looked through the old discussion on meta and didn't find this issue talked about.)

Once a question and answer have been posted here, they will remain for eternity, and we will be robbing other future students from the benefit of learning by thinking for themselves, and we make it harder for lecturers/professors in coming up with homework questions whose answers don't exist on the web.

Here, for instance, is a recent questionrecent question, where the questioner guessed the answer to a homework question but asked for an explanation of how it worked. Now, the homework question, its answer, and an explanation of the answer exist on the web.

Has the ethics of this issue been thought about?

It is tempting for students to ask their homework questions here, and it is equally tempting for people that know the answer to chip in with their answers. What are the ethics of this practice? (I have looked through the old discussion on meta and didn't find this issue talked about.)

Once a question and answer have been posted here, they will remain for eternity, and we will be robbing other future students from the benefit of learning by thinking for themselves, and we make it harder for lecturers/professors in coming up with homework questions whose answers don't exist on the web.

Here, for instance, is a recent question, where the questioner guessed the answer to a homework question but asked for an explanation of how it worked. Now, the homework question, its answer, and an explanation of the answer exist on the web.

Has the ethics of this issue been thought about?

It is tempting for students to ask their homework questions here, and it is equally tempting for people that know the answer to chip in with their answers. What are the ethics of this practice? (I have looked through the old discussion on meta and didn't find this issue talked about.)

Once a question and answer have been posted here, they will remain for eternity, and we will be robbing other future students from the benefit of learning by thinking for themselves, and we make it harder for lecturers/professors in coming up with homework questions whose answers don't exist on the web.

Here, for instance, is a recent question, where the questioner guessed the answer to a homework question but asked for an explanation of how it worked. Now, the homework question, its answer, and an explanation of the answer exist on the web.

Has the ethics of this issue been thought about?

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The ethics of answering homework questions

It is tempting for students to ask their homework questions here, and it is equally tempting for people that know the answer to chip in with their answers. What are the ethics of this practice? (I have looked through the old discussion on meta and didn't find this issue talked about.)

Once a question and answer have been posted here, they will remain for eternity, and we will be robbing other future students from the benefit of learning by thinking for themselves, and we make it harder for lecturers/professors in coming up with homework questions whose answers don't exist on the web.

Here, for instance, is a recent question, where the questioner guessed the answer to a homework question but asked for an explanation of how it worked. Now, the homework question, its answer, and an explanation of the answer exist on the web.

Has the ethics of this issue been thought about?