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2 replaced http://meta.programmers.stackexchange.com/ with https://softwareengineering.meta.stackexchange.com/
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Some time ago Mark Trapp asked what a P.SE web site would be aboutasked what a P.SE web site would be about and I posted an answer that received a moderate number of upvotes and a few comments. I've revised it a few times and there hasn't been any commentary in quite awhile so I'm going to go out on a limb and say that its a solid answer for "what our blog is about". Either way, I haven't seen any other movement on the topic so I'm moving it forward myself.

Based upon an S.E. blog post about getting a community blog started, our next step is to recruit contributors.

Recruit contributors. Who will write entries for the blog? Starting a blog is a bit like going through the buffet line. Be realistic – don’t let your eyes be bigger than your stomach. Think seriously about if and how often you will be able to contribute a blog post, including research/prep time. The more contributors there are, the less frequently each contributor needs to post. One post a month is a much easier to stomach than a couple posts every week.

This is a pretty sound assessment, in my opinion.

P.SE doesn't appear to get quite the volume of traffic that Stack Overflow or other sites receive but we do have several quality, experienced programmers who are also excellent writers that could contribute quality content.

Personally, I'm in favor of a post once a week, appearing every Monday. If we could attract just six people willing to write, that would mean just one submission from each individual every six weeks. This may seem like quite awhile between posts but I think that this would fit with the vision of a P.SE blog.

It would favor:

  • Long, not short posts.
  • Well written, thoughtful material.
  • A relaxed time frame so nobody gets burned out.
  • Time for an editorial process.

Allow me to clarify the last point. While most people who write blogs just write write write post! and then call it a day, we should be aspiring for the best. A P.SE blog post should not only represent the intellectual musings of one of the smartest programmers on the planet, it should also represent the highest quality of written English. There are some programmers out there who are truly, truly brilliant but can't write to save their lives. Rather than exclude such people I propose that every submission go through an editorial forge for grammar, punctuation, and formatting consistency.

Here's what I'd like to see:

  1. At least six people respond with something to the effect that you're at least interested in helping write - either let your your S.O./P.SE rep speak for itself, or post a few links to previous works (not necessarily written!)
  2. At least two people who'd be willing to act as proofreaders.

Some time ago Mark Trapp asked what a P.SE web site would be about and I posted an answer that received a moderate number of upvotes and a few comments. I've revised it a few times and there hasn't been any commentary in quite awhile so I'm going to go out on a limb and say that its a solid answer for "what our blog is about". Either way, I haven't seen any other movement on the topic so I'm moving it forward myself.

Based upon an S.E. blog post about getting a community blog started, our next step is to recruit contributors.

Recruit contributors. Who will write entries for the blog? Starting a blog is a bit like going through the buffet line. Be realistic – don’t let your eyes be bigger than your stomach. Think seriously about if and how often you will be able to contribute a blog post, including research/prep time. The more contributors there are, the less frequently each contributor needs to post. One post a month is a much easier to stomach than a couple posts every week.

This is a pretty sound assessment, in my opinion.

P.SE doesn't appear to get quite the volume of traffic that Stack Overflow or other sites receive but we do have several quality, experienced programmers who are also excellent writers that could contribute quality content.

Personally, I'm in favor of a post once a week, appearing every Monday. If we could attract just six people willing to write, that would mean just one submission from each individual every six weeks. This may seem like quite awhile between posts but I think that this would fit with the vision of a P.SE blog.

It would favor:

  • Long, not short posts.
  • Well written, thoughtful material.
  • A relaxed time frame so nobody gets burned out.
  • Time for an editorial process.

Allow me to clarify the last point. While most people who write blogs just write write write post! and then call it a day, we should be aspiring for the best. A P.SE blog post should not only represent the intellectual musings of one of the smartest programmers on the planet, it should also represent the highest quality of written English. There are some programmers out there who are truly, truly brilliant but can't write to save their lives. Rather than exclude such people I propose that every submission go through an editorial forge for grammar, punctuation, and formatting consistency.

Here's what I'd like to see:

  1. At least six people respond with something to the effect that you're at least interested in helping write - either let your your S.O./P.SE rep speak for itself, or post a few links to previous works (not necessarily written!)
  2. At least two people who'd be willing to act as proofreaders.

Some time ago Mark Trapp asked what a P.SE web site would be about and I posted an answer that received a moderate number of upvotes and a few comments. I've revised it a few times and there hasn't been any commentary in quite awhile so I'm going to go out on a limb and say that its a solid answer for "what our blog is about". Either way, I haven't seen any other movement on the topic so I'm moving it forward myself.

Based upon an S.E. blog post about getting a community blog started, our next step is to recruit contributors.

Recruit contributors. Who will write entries for the blog? Starting a blog is a bit like going through the buffet line. Be realistic – don’t let your eyes be bigger than your stomach. Think seriously about if and how often you will be able to contribute a blog post, including research/prep time. The more contributors there are, the less frequently each contributor needs to post. One post a month is a much easier to stomach than a couple posts every week.

This is a pretty sound assessment, in my opinion.

P.SE doesn't appear to get quite the volume of traffic that Stack Overflow or other sites receive but we do have several quality, experienced programmers who are also excellent writers that could contribute quality content.

Personally, I'm in favor of a post once a week, appearing every Monday. If we could attract just six people willing to write, that would mean just one submission from each individual every six weeks. This may seem like quite awhile between posts but I think that this would fit with the vision of a P.SE blog.

It would favor:

  • Long, not short posts.
  • Well written, thoughtful material.
  • A relaxed time frame so nobody gets burned out.
  • Time for an editorial process.

Allow me to clarify the last point. While most people who write blogs just write write write post! and then call it a day, we should be aspiring for the best. A P.SE blog post should not only represent the intellectual musings of one of the smartest programmers on the planet, it should also represent the highest quality of written English. There are some programmers out there who are truly, truly brilliant but can't write to save their lives. Rather than exclude such people I propose that every submission go through an editorial forge for grammar, punctuation, and formatting consistency.

Here's what I'd like to see:

  1. At least six people respond with something to the effect that you're at least interested in helping write - either let your your S.O./P.SE rep speak for itself, or post a few links to previous works (not necessarily written!)
  2. At least two people who'd be willing to act as proofreaders.
    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackProgrammer/status/119170104138268673
1
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Who Would Contribute to a P.SE Blog?

Some time ago Mark Trapp asked what a P.SE web site would be about and I posted an answer that received a moderate number of upvotes and a few comments. I've revised it a few times and there hasn't been any commentary in quite awhile so I'm going to go out on a limb and say that its a solid answer for "what our blog is about". Either way, I haven't seen any other movement on the topic so I'm moving it forward myself.

Based upon an S.E. blog post about getting a community blog started, our next step is to recruit contributors.

Recruit contributors. Who will write entries for the blog? Starting a blog is a bit like going through the buffet line. Be realistic – don’t let your eyes be bigger than your stomach. Think seriously about if and how often you will be able to contribute a blog post, including research/prep time. The more contributors there are, the less frequently each contributor needs to post. One post a month is a much easier to stomach than a couple posts every week.

This is a pretty sound assessment, in my opinion.

P.SE doesn't appear to get quite the volume of traffic that Stack Overflow or other sites receive but we do have several quality, experienced programmers who are also excellent writers that could contribute quality content.

Personally, I'm in favor of a post once a week, appearing every Monday. If we could attract just six people willing to write, that would mean just one submission from each individual every six weeks. This may seem like quite awhile between posts but I think that this would fit with the vision of a P.SE blog.

It would favor:

  • Long, not short posts.
  • Well written, thoughtful material.
  • A relaxed time frame so nobody gets burned out.
  • Time for an editorial process.

Allow me to clarify the last point. While most people who write blogs just write write write post! and then call it a day, we should be aspiring for the best. A P.SE blog post should not only represent the intellectual musings of one of the smartest programmers on the planet, it should also represent the highest quality of written English. There are some programmers out there who are truly, truly brilliant but can't write to save their lives. Rather than exclude such people I propose that every submission go through an editorial forge for grammar, punctuation, and formatting consistency.

Here's what I'd like to see:

  1. At least six people respond with something to the effect that you're at least interested in helping write - either let your your S.O./P.SE rep speak for itself, or post a few links to previous works (not necessarily written!)
  2. At least two people who'd be willing to act as proofreaders.